Cutty Sark

The iconic Cutty Sark Delve provides an immersive experience, that's not to be missed. Climb aboard and discover the adventures of this historic ship and her crew. 

The London Pass Cutty Sark is the last surviving tea clipper, and the fastest and greatest of her time. Normally £15.00 - Included with London Pass

Delve into the adventures of the Cutty Sark and her crew in an immersive experience that brings her fascinating history to life. Follow in the footsteps of those who sailed her, explore interactive displays that evoke the sights, smells and sounds of life at sea, enjoy sweeping views of the Thames, and walk right underneath the ship’s gleaming hull to touch a piece of world history. 

Enjoy access to Cutty Sark with The London Pass® 

- Pay nothing at the door – simply show your pass.
- Enjoy interactive displays.
- Discover what life was like onboard for the crew.



Skip to

- Cutty Sark history

- Cutty Sark highlights

- Cutty Sark facts

- Don’t miss

- Know before you go

- Make the most of your London Pass

- How to get there



Cutty Sark history
 

Clipper Ships were first introduced to the seas in the 1840s by American shipbuilders in response to booming commerce and the need for faster transportation of cargo to meet its demands. Commissioned by the British shipping magnate Jock ‘Whitehat’ Willis, the Cutty Sark was launched from Dumbarton in 1869. She was a masterpiece - a showcase of expert sailing ship design. Her three masts set the ship forwards at an incredible speed of 17 knots, making her one of the fastest ships on the sea in the 1870s. 

Her speed made her a highly profitable vessel as she traversed the globe, bringing crops of tea from China - an incredibly fashionable commodity in the tearooms and parlours of Victorian Britain. Inflated by the stories of her prowess on water and her success in trade, the Cutty Sark’s owners put her forward for a tea race in 1872. The stakes were high as people put huge bets on her sure-fire victory. She ran neck and neck with a competing boat, Thermopylae, in the Indian Ocean, until the Cutty Sark’s rudder broke loose, costing her the race, but nevertheless cementing her legend on the water. 

However, there were dark times ahead. Industry spurred on the advent of steamships on the water, setting a new standard of speed for merchant ships around the world. And in 1880, when the Cutty Sark set off on a voyage to Japan, a fight amongst the crew left one man dead and a mutinous crew on board. The captain committed suicide thinking his career was ruined. The Cutty Sark was held to account and soon a new reputation was assigned to her as a ‘hellship’: a cursed vessel. Her fortunes, however, were not to be consigned to superstition for long. 

For a decade, she would preserve her legend on water through lightning voyages and the careful and generous attention of her owner, Jock Willis. After ceasing to be profitable, she spent 25 years transporting cargo, managing to avoid German U-boats during World War I and in 1936, she spent her time as a Training College at Greenhithe by British naval cadets. 

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Cutty Sark highlights

  • Delve into the adventures of this iconic ship and her crew in an immersive experience that brings her fascinating history to life.

  • Follow in the footsteps of those who sailed her, explore interactive displays that evoke the sights, smells and sounds of life at sea, enjoy sweeping views of the Thames, and walk right underneath the ship’s gleaming hull to touch a piece of world history. 

  • The Cutty Sark Cafe, situated directly underneath the ship's spectacular hull, provides a relaxed setting for a Cutty Sark-inspired cup of tea and cake.

  • Take away a memory of the ship when you leave; a bespoke range of quality gifts is available at the Cutty Sark shop.

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Cutty Sark facts

  • Watch the video above to find out how the Cutty Sark got her name! 

  • Cutty Sark is 150 years old. During her years as a British merchant ship, she visited sixteen different countries, travelling the equivalent of two and a half voyages to the moon and back.

  • Built to last for just 30 years, the Cutty Sark almost doubled her lifespan by serving as a working ship for 52 years. The survivor of heavy seas, war, neglect, obsolescence, fire and old age, she is now proudly displayed for all to see in Greenwich. 

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Don't miss

Featured activities 
For a full list of things to do aboard the Cutty Sark, check the official site

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Know before you go

For accessibility options and facilities, please visit the official site.

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Getting in

Present your London Pass to a member of staff at the site. 

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Make the most of your London Pass®

Check our attractions nearby section for more places to go nearby with your London Pass.

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How to get there

- Cutty Sark (DLR).
- Greenwich and Maze Hill rail station (national rail network).
- Greenwich Pier.

 

For more things to do in London, check out The London Pass blog.

 

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"I would do this again and again! There is so much to do with this pass you can't even get it all in! And you MUST get the travel option. My mates and I went everywhere for one fee and never had to worry about paying for travel. It is a must purchase and I will get it again."
Rob from USA

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Getting to Cutty Sark

Getting to Cutty Sark

  • Cutty Sark King William Walk, Greenwich, SE10 9HT
  • Closest Underground Station Cutty Sark DLR
  • Closest Bus Stop Stop A & B: Route 188 199 N1 N199

Opening Times

Monday 10.00 – 17.00
Tuesday 10.00 – 17.00
Wednesday 10.00 – 17.00
Thursday 10.00 – 17.00
Friday 10.00 – 17.00
Saturday 10.00 – 17.00
Sunday 10.00 – 17.00
Last Admission: 16.15

Attractions Nearby

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